This small yellow farm house belongs to Emily Oakley and Mike Appel who are the owners and sole operators of a five acre, organic vegetable farm in Oaks Oklahoma. Oakley and Appel have been working the land on Three Springs Farm for five years and have experienced the many challenges and successes that come with life on a farm. Nick Oxford for The New York Times

This small yellow farm house belongs to Emily Oakley and Mike Appel who are the owners and sole operators of a five acre, organic vegetable farm in Oaks Oklahoma. Oakley and Appel have been working the land on Three Springs Farm for five years and have experienced the many challenges and successes that come with life on a farm.
Nick Oxford for The New York Times

 Emily Oakley and Mike Appel gather some equipment from their barn before harvesting organic vegetables on Three Springs Farm in Oaks Oklahoma. "Farming is not a profession, it's a way of life" said Appel. Nick Oxford for The New York Times

Emily Oakley and Mike Appel gather some equipment from their barn before harvesting organic vegetables on Three Springs Farm in Oaks Oklahoma. "Farming is not a profession, it's a way of life" said Appel.
Nick Oxford for The New York Times

 "This is the first tractor that we ever bought, even though it didn't run very well it was cheap" said Emily Oakley. Many young farmers find it difficult to get loans to purchase new farming equipment for their operations. "We've got a new tractor now but we'll always love that one." Nick Oxford for The New York Times

"This is the first tractor that we ever bought, even though it didn't run very well it was cheap" said Emily Oakley. Many young farmers find it difficult to get loans to purchase new farming equipment for their operations. "We've got a new tractor now but we'll always love that one."
Nick Oxford for The New York Times

 Emily Oakley sprays an organic Sea Kelp and fish emulsion on strawberry plants that will be harvested next spring on Three Springs Farm in Oaks Oklahoma. "We only use completely organic fertilizers on our produce so that our customers know exactly what they are going to get" said Oakley. Nick Oxford for The New York Times

Emily Oakley sprays an organic Sea Kelp and fish emulsion on strawberry plants that will be harvested next spring on Three Springs Farm in Oaks Oklahoma. "We only use completely organic fertilizers on our produce so that our customers know exactly what they are going to get" said Oakley.
Nick Oxford for The New York Times

 Mike Appel walks through a winter "cover crop" of oats and peas on Three Springs Organic Farm in Oaks Oklahoma. "We don't harvest it, it just composts into the ground and makes for great soil" said Appel. Nick Oxford for The New York Times

Mike Appel walks through a winter "cover crop" of oats and peas on Three Springs Organic Farm in Oaks Oklahoma. "We don't harvest it, it just composts into the ground and makes for great soil" said Appel.
Nick Oxford for The New York Times

 Emily Oakley and Mike Appel harvest vegetables in the hoop house on Three Springs Farm in Oaks Oklahoma. The couple owns and are the only workers on the small five acre farm. "This is definitely a profession that chooses you" said Appel. Nick Oxford for The New York Times

Emily Oakley and Mike Appel harvest vegetables in the hoop house on Three Springs Farm in Oaks Oklahoma. The couple owns and are the only workers on the small five acre farm. "This is definitely a profession that chooses you" said Appel.
Nick Oxford for The New York Times

 Mike Appel harvests some spinach on the organic vegetable farm which he owns and operates along with Emily Oakley in Oaks Oklahoma. "People get really excited about our produce once they try it, they don't know what real vegetables are supposed to taste like" said Appel. Nick Oxford for The New York Times

Mike Appel harvests some spinach on the organic vegetable farm which he owns and operates along with Emily Oakley in Oaks Oklahoma. "People get really excited about our produce once they try it, they don't know what real vegetables are supposed to taste like" said Appel.
Nick Oxford for The New York Times

 Emily Oakley harvests lettuce in a hoop house at Three Springs Farm in Oaks Oklahoma. The hoop house was purchased with a grant from the USDA. "I would love to see more kids wanting to grow up to be farmers" said Oakley. Nick Oxford for The New York Times

Emily Oakley harvests lettuce in a hoop house at Three Springs Farm in Oaks Oklahoma. The hoop house was purchased with a grant from the USDA. "I would love to see more kids wanting to grow up to be farmers" said Oakley.
Nick Oxford for The New York Times

 Freshly harvested sweet turnips lay gathered on Three Springs Farm in Oaks Oklahoma. "The sweet turnips are one of our most popular sellers, you can't buy them in a grocery store anywhere" said farmer Emily Oakley. Nick Oxford for The New York Times

Freshly harvested sweet turnips lay gathered on Three Springs Farm in Oaks Oklahoma. "The sweet turnips are one of our most popular sellers, you can't buy them in a grocery store anywhere" said farmer Emily Oakley.
Nick Oxford for The New York Times

 This small yellow farm house belongs to Emily Oakley and Mike Appel who are the owners and sole operators of a five acre, organic vegetable farm in Oaks Oklahoma. Oakley and Appel have been working the land on Three Springs Farm for five years and have experienced the many challenges and successes that come with life on a farm. Nick Oxford for The New York Times
 Emily Oakley and Mike Appel gather some equipment from their barn before harvesting organic vegetables on Three Springs Farm in Oaks Oklahoma. "Farming is not a profession, it's a way of life" said Appel. Nick Oxford for The New York Times
 "This is the first tractor that we ever bought, even though it didn't run very well it was cheap" said Emily Oakley. Many young farmers find it difficult to get loans to purchase new farming equipment for their operations. "We've got a new tractor now but we'll always love that one." Nick Oxford for The New York Times
 Emily Oakley sprays an organic Sea Kelp and fish emulsion on strawberry plants that will be harvested next spring on Three Springs Farm in Oaks Oklahoma. "We only use completely organic fertilizers on our produce so that our customers know exactly what they are going to get" said Oakley. Nick Oxford for The New York Times
 Mike Appel walks through a winter "cover crop" of oats and peas on Three Springs Organic Farm in Oaks Oklahoma. "We don't harvest it, it just composts into the ground and makes for great soil" said Appel. Nick Oxford for The New York Times
 Emily Oakley and Mike Appel harvest vegetables in the hoop house on Three Springs Farm in Oaks Oklahoma. The couple owns and are the only workers on the small five acre farm. "This is definitely a profession that chooses you" said Appel. Nick Oxford for The New York Times
 Mike Appel harvests some spinach on the organic vegetable farm which he owns and operates along with Emily Oakley in Oaks Oklahoma. "People get really excited about our produce once they try it, they don't know what real vegetables are supposed to taste like" said Appel. Nick Oxford for The New York Times
 Emily Oakley harvests lettuce in a hoop house at Three Springs Farm in Oaks Oklahoma. The hoop house was purchased with a grant from the USDA. "I would love to see more kids wanting to grow up to be farmers" said Oakley. Nick Oxford for The New York Times
 Freshly harvested sweet turnips lay gathered on Three Springs Farm in Oaks Oklahoma. "The sweet turnips are one of our most popular sellers, you can't buy them in a grocery store anywhere" said farmer Emily Oakley. Nick Oxford for The New York Times

This small yellow farm house belongs to Emily Oakley and Mike Appel who are the owners and sole operators of a five acre, organic vegetable farm in Oaks Oklahoma. Oakley and Appel have been working the land on Three Springs Farm for five years and have experienced the many challenges and successes that come with life on a farm.
Nick Oxford for The New York Times

Emily Oakley and Mike Appel gather some equipment from their barn before harvesting organic vegetables on Three Springs Farm in Oaks Oklahoma. "Farming is not a profession, it's a way of life" said Appel.
Nick Oxford for The New York Times

"This is the first tractor that we ever bought, even though it didn't run very well it was cheap" said Emily Oakley. Many young farmers find it difficult to get loans to purchase new farming equipment for their operations. "We've got a new tractor now but we'll always love that one."
Nick Oxford for The New York Times

Emily Oakley sprays an organic Sea Kelp and fish emulsion on strawberry plants that will be harvested next spring on Three Springs Farm in Oaks Oklahoma. "We only use completely organic fertilizers on our produce so that our customers know exactly what they are going to get" said Oakley.
Nick Oxford for The New York Times

Mike Appel walks through a winter "cover crop" of oats and peas on Three Springs Organic Farm in Oaks Oklahoma. "We don't harvest it, it just composts into the ground and makes for great soil" said Appel.
Nick Oxford for The New York Times

Emily Oakley and Mike Appel harvest vegetables in the hoop house on Three Springs Farm in Oaks Oklahoma. The couple owns and are the only workers on the small five acre farm. "This is definitely a profession that chooses you" said Appel.
Nick Oxford for The New York Times

Mike Appel harvests some spinach on the organic vegetable farm which he owns and operates along with Emily Oakley in Oaks Oklahoma. "People get really excited about our produce once they try it, they don't know what real vegetables are supposed to taste like" said Appel.
Nick Oxford for The New York Times

Emily Oakley harvests lettuce in a hoop house at Three Springs Farm in Oaks Oklahoma. The hoop house was purchased with a grant from the USDA. "I would love to see more kids wanting to grow up to be farmers" said Oakley.
Nick Oxford for The New York Times

Freshly harvested sweet turnips lay gathered on Three Springs Farm in Oaks Oklahoma. "The sweet turnips are one of our most popular sellers, you can't buy them in a grocery store anywhere" said farmer Emily Oakley.
Nick Oxford for The New York Times

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